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Hyundai and Kia to use Bell’s network for future connected cars, service will be free for the first five years

An image showing the Bell logo atop a corporate office

Connected cars from Hyundai and Kia are coming to Canada, and when they do, they’re going to operate on the Bell network.

Bell’s announced a partnership with Hyundai AutoEver Telematics America (HATA) — the Hyundai division concerned with information technology, as well as the Internet of Things (IoT).

According to a Bell media release, the partnership begins this summer and will be available through Hyundai’s BlueLink and Kia’s UVO Intelligence in-vehicle services.

“Integrating Bell wireless technology with Hyundai BlueLink and Kia UVO Intelligence underscores Bell’s place at the forefront of the Internet of the Thing (IoT) connected car movement,” said Gary Semplonius, vice president of business sales and marketing for Bell Mobility, in a media release.

Ted Lancaster, vice president and COO of Kia Canada, said that the service will be free for the first five years, and will be launched with the 2018 Kia Optima and the “all-new” 2018 Kia Rio 5-door.

“By adding Bell’s reliable and built-in wireless connection, we can provide our customers with an innovative driving and riding experience, from safety and diagnostics to the integration of third-party apps,” said Lancaster.

Hyundai’s BlueLink service will launch with the 2018 Elantra GT 5-door and the 2018 Sonata. Hyundai is also offering its service free for five years following the purchase of either vehicle.

This is Bell’s latest investment in IoT technology, and the company is clearly trying to position itself as a leader in the Canadian IoT industry.

On June 1, 2017, Bell announced plans to release an LTE network designed specifically for IoT devices.

On May 31, 2017, Bell contributed $500,000 CAD to the University of Manitoba to fund an agricultural and food industry IoT program.

Source: Bell

Author

  • Sameer Chhabra

    Sameer Chhabra is a recent graduate from the University of Western Ontario’s Master of Media in Journalism and Communication program. In his free time, Sameer can be found watching Aaron Sorkin-penned dramas and trying to learn about the stories that Canadians don’t know they don’t know.

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